Title IX and Campus Save Act – Prevention

Avoiding Dangerous Situations

While you can never completely protect yourself from sexual assault, there are some things you can do to help reduce your risk of being assaulted.

  • Be aware of your surroundings. Knowing where you are and who is around you may help you to find a way to get out of a bad situation.
  • Try to avoid isolated areas. It is more difficult to get help if no one is around.
  • Walk with purpose. Even if you don’t know where you are going, act like you do.
  • Trust your instincts. If a situation or location feels unsafe or uncomfortable, it probably isn’t the best place to be.
  • Try not to load yourself down with packages or bags as this can make you appear more vulnerable.
  • Make sure your cell phone is with you and charged and that you have cab money.
  • Don’t allow yourself to be isolated with someone you don’t trust or someone you don’t know.
  • Avoid putting music headphones in both ears so that you can be more aware of your surroundings, especially if you are walking alone.

On Campus or Around Town

Walking

  • Make sure your cell phone is easily accessible and fully charged.
  • Take major, public paths rather than less populated shortcuts.
  • Avoid dimly lit places and talk to Facilities Management if lights need to be installed in an area.
  • Avoid putting music headphones in both ears so that you can be more aware of your surroundings, especially if you are walking alone.
  • Walking back from the library very late at night is sometimes unavoidable, so try to walk with a friend.
  • Carry a noisemaker (like a whistle) on your keychain.
  • Carry a small flashlight on your keychain.
  • If walking feels unsafe, try calling Campus Safety.  706.233.7911. Campus Safety offers a safety escort 24 hours a day.

Driving

  • Keep your doors locked.
  • Have extra car necessities (oil, jumper cables, etc.).
  • Try not to wait until the last minute to fill your gas tank; always keep it at least half full if you can.
  • Have your keys ready when you go to unlock your car.

Dorm Safety

  • Lock your door when you go to sleep and when you are not in the room.
  • Keep your window locked (especially if it is easy to enter from the ground).
  • If people constantly prop open the main dorm door, talk to your RA about it.
  • Avoid isolated areas (stairways, laundry rooms, basement, etc.) when you are alone.

In Social Situations

While you can never completely protect yourself from sexual assault, there are some things you can do to help reduce your risk of being assaulted in social situations.

  1. When you go to a social gathering, go with a group of friends. Arrive together, check in with each other throughout the evening, and leave together. Knowing where you are and who is around you may help you to find a way out of a bad situation.
  2. Trust your instincts. If you feel unsafe in any situation, go with your gut. If you see something suspicious, contact law enforcement immediately (local authorities can be reached by calling 911 or call Campus Safety at 706.233.7911.
  3. Don’t leave your drink unattended while talking, dancing, using the restroom, or making a phone call. If you’ve left your drink alone, just get a new one (non-alcoholic!!!!!).
  4. Don’t accept drinks from people you don’t know or trust. At parties, don’t drink from the punch bowls or other large, common open containers.
  5. Watch out for your friends, and vice versa. 
  6. If you suspect you or a friend has been drugged, contact law enforcement immediately (local authorities can be reached by calling 911 ). 

If Someone is Pressuring You

If you need to get out of an uncomfortable or scary situation here are some things that you can try:

  1. Remember that being in this situation is not your fault. You did not do anything wrong, it is the person who is making you uncomfortable that is to blame.
  2. Be true to yourself. Don’t feel obligated to do anything you don’t want to do. “I don’t want to” is always a good enough reason. Do what feels right to you and what you are comfortable with.
  3. Have a code word with your friends or family so that if you don’t feel comfortable you can call them and communicate your discomfort without the person you are with knowing. Your friends or family can then come to get you or make up an excuse for you to leave.
  4. Lie. If you don’t want to hurt the person’s feelings it is better to lie and make up a reason to leave than to stay and be uncomfortable, scared, or worse. Some excuses you could use are: needing to take care of a friend or family member, not feeling well, having somewhere else that you need to be, etc.
  5. Try to think of an escape route. How would you try to get out of the room? Where are the doors? Windows? Are there people around who might be able to help you? Is there an emergency phone nearby?
  6. If you and/or the other person have been drinking, you can say that you would rather wait until you both have your full judgment before doing anything you may regret later.

Sexual Assault Prevention materials from:

Rape, abuse & Incest national network

 

 

 

 

 

 

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